My husband has been a professional painter over 30 years. He prides himself in his high level of work ethic and customer satisfaction. He stays up to date on techniques and finishes. He gives Very detail and accurate appraisals with contracts. At an alarming rate, as he starts to finish the last day or the day before, the client starts nit picking and being disrespectful towards his work when every day prior to that, they were very pleased, as he request ongoing satisfaction throughout the job. Then they don't to want pay remaining balance, bicker about final cost, or stop payment. He has a crew he has to pay whether the customer does or doesn't honor the contract as well as our own household expenses. Wasted time ,labor, money and effort lost. Now how do we fix this? Remind yourself and clients that a contract is based on honor.
So sad that Angie's List requires the contractor be notified!! They have lost me as a client. If I'm dissatisfied and want to give an "F" rating (question/workers...I SHOULD NOT be intimidated into passing up an opportunity to explain my experience! There is NO WAY my contractor got an Aplus rating from over five hundred people....so someone was lying....yet I can't report that without the contractor knowing it? REALLY?
Alamo Paint Contractor prides itself on being the number one home improvement company in the area. We service both residential and commercial properties. We've built an excellent reputation for customer satisfaction by providing quick estimates, paying great attention to detail, and by offering competitive pricing. Our being a screened and approved professional gives you the peace of mind you need to allow us to give your home the attention it deserves. Call us today! Serious inquiries only please! If you have basic pricing questions please call us at (917) 600-1382 . Small projects starting from as low as $250.00 (White) and from as low $350.00 ( other colored paint included!

If the point of hiring a well established, experienced, reputable painting contractor is to secure the professionalism and trust suggested to be inherent with that choice, then I would EXPECT that professionalism and experience to include the ability to make the proper and correct calculations for labor and materials for a fixed price quote, and there should be NO reason for the contractor to put the cost burden of their miscalculation on the consumer.
The quality of materials used on your project will impact how it looks and how long it lasts. There is a huge difference in quality among coatings like paints and stains. There are also many specialized coatings that should be used for specific applications. Differences in the costs of a $9 gallon of paint versus a $50 gallon of paint represent real differences in the ingredients, with higher-priced paint having more expensive ingredients that look better and last longer, such as resins, binders and even titanium.
I'm an architect and my firm routinely specifies interior finishes for projects so I thought I'd contribute a professional's perspective on the issue of how many coats of paint are deemed "acceptable". The fact of the matter is the average consumer usually isn't a paint expert and can't be expected to know about all the factors that impact coverage. That knowledge is considered "means and methods" and in a court of law, the responsibility lies with the painter or general contractor, not the consumer. What the consumer should be concerned about is the final result-does it look good and is it what you expected? The simplest way to communicate this to your painter is to stipule in your written agreement that the number of coats will be "as required to cover". That way all the guess work about what kind of primer, how many coats, how color affects the scope of work, etc., is removed from the consumer's responsibility and resides where it belongs-with the professional. In the contract that's why retention is always a good idea-typically 10% is withheld from payment until the job is completed to the satisfaction of the customer. Of course in return you as the customer have to be reasonable about what constitutes a completed job. Just my $.02.
I turn away any job when the client refuses to pay anything up front. It sends a red flag. I also charge a scheduling fee which is non-refundable. I get 33 percent when I show up and begin work. Another percentage halfway through, and the balance upon completion after client is satisfied. There needs to be skin in the game for both parties as a measure of good faith. If you are dealing with a reputable company (did your due diligence, right?) why wouldn't you want to pay something as work progresses? We do this not only because we love to paint but we require cash flow to stay in business. There is not always 'money in the bank' as you suggest. It's tough these days. The suggestion buy 'Kim' 'Never pay a contractor a deposit' is nonsensical.
According to the EPA, professional painters must check for lead -- especially if a home was built before 1978. Many DIY painters forget to test for lead paint. Testing kits are available in home improvement stores for less than $40. You can also hire a lead testing and removal professional to do this work quickly and efficiently on your behalf. Lead paint can be dangerous; it's far better to find it before you put time and effort into painting your home than after the fact.
Over the past year I have had several jobs given to 2 Angie's list recommendations and 1 not from a recommendation. They all have one thing in common, lack of sufficient and correct preparation to save time, labor, and the fact that they put a person in charge that was a cut corners type of worker. The two from Angie's list sent worker/s back to try touch up problems, but once the job is not prepared correctly in the first place any extra work is like putting a band-aid on a dirty wound.
If you have ornamental or colorful trees, shrubbery or floral selections around your home you should figure their colors into the color scheme selection that is made.  These landscaping attributes will have an effect on how appealing the property is as a whole throughout the year.  Homes that have a great deal of trees can make the property darker and cast shadows onto the home.  Individuals will want to avoid darker colors for these situations.
I agree with you Richard, as a painting contractor for very many years, people are always looking to get more and more out of you. I had to give an estimate to a lady a few weeks ago who had more stuff around her home than a thrift store including heavy furniture, stuff all over the floor and junk everywhere. I knew if I accepted the job id be a furniture mover and cleaner. I also agree this article makes it seem like the contractor is out to rip off the customers. Fact is I always leave doing more work than agreed upon. It doesn't bother me since the customer is always satisfied. Just saying

Like most worthwhile undertakings, finding a good contractor is a step-by-step process. The first step is to ask around. Contacts like real-estate agents and general contractors may be able to give you quality referrals, but so might your local paint store, your Aunt Trudy, the guy in the cubicle next to yours, or a neighbor whose house was recently painted. If you come across a newly painted house and there’s an ad for the contractor on the front lawn, it’s a sign that the customer was satisfied.
Before the scrubdown, protect nearby plants by misting their leaves and saturating the surrounding soil with water, pulling them away from the house, and shrouding them in fabric drop cloths. (Plants will cook under plastic.) Lay more drop cloths along the base of the walls to collect any falling paint debris. Walls should be wet down before getting scrubbed, then washed with a gallon of water mixed with 1 cup chlorine bleach and 1 cup of either a concentrated, phosphate-free cleaner, such as a trisodium phosphate (TSP) substitute, or Jomax House Cleaner. Working in sections, from the bottom to the top, will avoid streaks. Be sure to rinse walls well before the solution dries. Wood siding and trim should be ready to paint after a day or two of dry weather.
James and all of his crew are truly experienced professionals. From beginning to end they were up front, honest, and fair. They did a beautiful and timely job and were knowledgeable about every step of the process. They patched windows and replaced a rotten wooden door without my even having to ask. I never felt the need to look over their shoulder because I was confident in both their skills and aesthetic. Andrew was the head guy assigned to my project and he couldn't have been more lovely to work with ( a bit of a language barrier, but we made it work). I would highly recommend this company and will look no further in the future. These are guys that take pride in their work.
"We hired Dustin at James Kate Roofing to replace the asphalt roof on our home in Richardson after receiving three other bids. We are very thankful to have had the opportunity to work with Dustin on this project. Our roof was installed in a very professional way using quality materials at a reasonable price. Dustin was always available when I called and completed the job when scheduled. By the way, he saved us over $8k compared to other bids. Dustin is now our roofer for life! Perfect!"

I was a painting contractor for many years and never asked for a deposit upfront. A good contractor should have great credit with his suppliers and an even better contract if the deal should go south before the job is done. Get to know your customer and explain how each paint covers so they understand fully before you have to apply 3 or 4 coats. If you didn't bid your job right and the client has already signed the contract then that is on you not the client. Yes I haven had to eat the difference but the client was happy and a return customer for years so I made up for it.

Once work begins, hold brief daily meetings to discuss the job and schedule and quash any misunderstandings. If there are surprises, seek middle ground. No contract can anticipate every possibility. Materials may be unavailable. Large chunks of rotten siding may crumble along with the old paint. Exterior jobs may be stopped cold by a week of steady rain. But know that you'll pay extra if you change your mind about a color after the trim is already painted or otherwise add tasks to the project.


Tom (the owner) responded quickly with an estimate and was able to add additional painting that we requested (e.g., paint window trim). He was also able to provide an accurate timeframe regarding when… the work would be completed. Schell met with us to help pick out our paint choices. She provide wonderful insight into the colors that might work. She didn't try to overly influence our choices but provided options and gave us her expert opinion when we asked. She also took into account our needs when scheduling the work. We needed to have repair work done on rotting wood on the window sills on our porch and a border removed from a bedroom. Jeff and Tracey provided expert carpentry work to fix things prior to painting. They were friendly and came to the job prepared with the tools and wood they needed. They got right to work and finished the job quicker than I would have expected. This isn't their first rodeo, as the saying goes. The painters (Shawn and company) came prepared for our job, worked hard, and explained any difficulties and suggested fixes (another coat of paint) encountered in our job. Shawn and his painters didn't waste any time not working - they each had their roles and attacked the job with energy. Shawn and crew were friendly and made sure they kept in touch with us daily to let us know when they planned to arrive and leave our job, accommodate our schedule, and let us know about the progress they were making. There was not a lot of standing around but much hard work, even in ninety plus degree weather. They also made sure that our three house cats didn't escape:) .
Hi Richard, Thanks for reaching out. Please visit our website to browse pro reviews in those areas or submit a service request http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. If you would like to speak w/ a rep about your project and get assistance finding the right pro in these areas please send your contact info to [email protected] and someone will reach out. -HASupport
The floor and ceiling surfaces cannot be ignored, as they are crucial elements of color combination. Most ceilings are traditionally painted white for a number of reasons — particularly for their ability to keep rooms looking bright and to avoid taking attention away from the walls. Lighter ceiling colors can also help to make a room appear larger and more open.
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I was a painting contractor for many years and never asked for a deposit upfront. A good contractor should have great credit with his suppliers and an even better contract if the deal should go south before the job is done. Get to know your customer and explain how each paint covers so they understand fully before you have to apply 3 or 4 coats. If you didn't bid your job right and the client has already signed the contract then that is on you not the client. Yes I haven had to eat the difference but the client was happy and a return customer for years so I made up for it.
Typically, materials account for 15% of the cost charged by painters. Buying the painting supplies yourself may help you save a lot of money down the road. Be prepared to buy 2-3 gallons for painting the interior walls of an average-sized room. In addition to paints and primers 3, you will need paint brushes, rollers, face masks, rubber gloves, painter’s tape, drop cloths, sandpaper etc. While you can pick up disposable painting brushes for under a dollar from home improvement stores, reusable higher-end brushes can cost as much as $20. A standard roll of 0.98 inches painter’s tape (180 feet) will cost around $5. Equipments such as ladders or scaffolding 4 can be rented for a small cost. An interior scaffold with adjustable platform heights from 2’ to 12’ in 2” increments can be rented for around $8 per hour.

Painting can be a huge pain. Leaping over piles of furniture and ducking around ladders in your yard for weeks isn’t exactly fun, is it? (Unless, of course, you’re training for a furniture dodging competition.) You only have so much time, and that time is valuable—that’s why we aim to have your painting job done fast. Our painters are fully licensed, insured and bonded. When we say we are the most trusted painting company, we mean it!


Though painting often creates a mess, a professional painter will ensure that your home is maintained as clean as possible during the entire project. Unless otherwise specified in the contract, most painters will clean up and take care of paint debris removal. However, there may be additional charges for using the landfill. Standard landfill fees range from $20 to $50 per ton.
Tom (the owner) responded quickly with an estimate and was able to add additional painting that we requested (e.g., paint window trim). He was also able to provide an accurate timeframe regarding when the work would be completed. Schell met with us to help pick out our paint choices. She provide wonderful insight into the colors that might work. She didn't try to overly influence our choices but provided options and gave us her expert opinion when we asked. She also took into account our needs when scheduling the work. We needed to have repair work done on rotting wood on the window sills on our porch and a border removed from a bedroom. Jeff and Tracey provided expert carpentry work to fix things prior to painting. They were friendly and came to the job prepared with the tools and wood they needed. They got right to work and finished the job quicker than I would have expected. This isn't their first rodeo, as the saying goes. The painters (Shawn and company) came prepared for our job, worked hard, and explained any difficulties and suggested fixes (another coat of paint) encountered in our job. Shawn and his painters didn't waste any time not working - they each had their roles and attacked the job with energy. Shawn and crew were friendly and made sure they kept in touch with us daily to let us know when they planned to arrive and leave our job, accommodate our schedule, and let us know about the progress they were making. There was not a lot of standing around but much hard work, even in ninety plus degree weather. They also made sure that our three house cats didn't escape:) .  

Sand the trim with a fine-grit sanding sponge. Sponges get into crevices where sandpaper can’t go and let you apply even pressure. Then apply the first coat of paint, let it dry at least 24 hours, lightly sand it again for a completely smooth surface, and apply the second coat. After each sanding, vacuum the trim, then wipe it down with a tack cloth to remove the dust.

Home Painters Highlands Ranch Co 39.5358216 -104.9716488


Because it is next to impossible to find out information about local painting contractors on the Internet, the old adage “talk to neighbors” applies here. Some painting contractors display signs on the lawns of houses they are working on, but you find this more with general contractors and siding and replacement windows companies. So, other than the painter’s white panel van out front, you often do not know what is going on inside your neighbors’ houses.
To remove a bad piece of siding, you have to pull out two rows of nails: the ones in the bad board itself, and those in the board directly above. Siding is thin and splits easily, so the tricky part of this job is pulling nails without damaging surrounding boards. A cat’s paw is the best tool for digging out nails if damage to the surrounding wood doesn’t matter (Photo 1). House Painting Home Painters Highlands Ranch Colorado Click Here
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